About The LEP

The LEP is an editing process created by McIntoshLinguistics that uses the concepts of grammatical “form” and “function” to study and describe morphology, syntax, and orthography.

Used in combination with a grammatical method called MCINTOSHFORMS™, which uses regular expressions (regexes) and/or grammatical forms (letters, words, phrases, and punctuation) to isolate grammatical constituents and grammatical functions within a MS Word document, the LEP helps ensure your edit will result in the construction of a highly readable (close reading) and grammatically sound (effective writing) literary manuscript.

According to this Britannica article on Chomsky’s theories of grammar and language, there is a notion that language produces “an infinite number of grammatical phrases and sentences using only finite means.” The LEP in combination with MCINTOSHFORMS™ aims to reinforce this notion.

How the LEP works

The LEP is divided into three parts:

  1. Syntax: Form (Morphology, Phrases, and Clauses) and Function
  2. Shape: Orthography (hyphenation and punctuation)
  3. Readability: Coordination and Parallelism, and Contrast and Opposition

The LEP demonstrates that grammar influences diction, and as such utilizes the process-method of McIntoshLinguistics to help ensure your edit will result in the construction of a highly readable (close reading) and grammatically sound (effective writing) literary manuscript.

Purpose of The LEP

The LEP in combination with MCINTOSHFORMS™ helps you analyze/review your literary manuscript through the lens of syntax, shape, and readability. The LEP identifies some of the most integral operatives (words, phrases, clauses, and punctuation) involved in constructing a highly readable and semantically sound literary manuscript. While the LEP focuses on the editing process, it also reinforces the importance of the writer’s taking it upon himself or herself to study every nuance and aspect of English, should he or she want to be further empowered to tell stories that delve into the very psychology of its characters, milieu, and narrative devices.

Language alone protects us from the scariness of things with no names. Language alone is meditation.

—Toni Morrison

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